English Curriculum

Requirements for an English Major: 36 units
(20 units minimum upper division)

The college recognizes as an English major anyone who formally declares an intention
to complete a minimum of 36 units in English (with at least 20 upper-division units),
including one course from each of the three following categories:

Required Core: 12 units

One course in British literature before 1800: (4)

  • * ENG 046 Survey of British Literature to 1800 (4)
  • ENG 158 Literature of the English Renaissance 1485-1600 (4)
  • ENG 166 Neoclassic Literature 1660-1798 (4)

One course in British literature after 1800: (4)

  • * ENG 047 Survey of British Literature 1800-Present (4)
  • ENG 121 Romantic Literature 1798-1832 (4)
  • ENG 122 Victorian Literature 1832-1900 (4)
  • ENG 170 British Novel 1700-1900 (4)

One upper-division course on a major author: (4)

  • *ENG 117 Shakespeare (4)
  • ENG 151 Milton and the Early 17th Century (4)
  • ENG 152 Chaucer and Medieval Literature (4)

(Note: An " * " next to a course indicates it can be substituted with an approved England Semester course.)

In addition to the core requirements above, all majors must complete one of the
following concentrations: 24 units


A. Literature Concentration:

  • Three literature courses (12)
  • Three literature or writing courses (12)

B. Writing Concentration:

  • Three literature courses, (12)
  • Three writing courses from the following, (12)
    • ENG 087 Introduction to Journalism (4)
    • ENG 090 Literary Critical Strategies (4)
    • ENG 101 Film Studies (4)
    • ENG 104 Modern Grammar and Advanced Composition (4)
    • ENG 111 Screenwriting I (4)
    • ENG 112 Screenwriting II (4)
    • ENG 113 Screenwriting III (4)
    • ENG 141 Creative Writing (4)
    • ENG 142 Workshop in Creative Writing (4)
    • ENG 167 Writers’ Corner Practicum (2)
    • ENG 168 or 169 Journalism Practicum (2, 2)
    • IS 190 Approved Urban Practicum (4)

Guidelines for Graduate Study Preparation in English Literature: 54-62 units

English majors who wish to pursue graduate study in literature must meet the general
requirements for an English major but should complete a minimum of 54-62 units
using the following general guidelines. Courses may be substituted for with an
approved off-campus alternative.

A modern or ancient language at the intermediate level: 0-8 units

Lower-Division Courses: 8-12 units

  • ENG 090 Literary Critical Strategies (4)
  • ENG 044 Studies in World Literature (4) or ENG 045 Studies in Classic Literature (4)
  • ENG 046 Survey of British Literature to 1800 (4)
  • ENG 047 Survey of British Literature 1800-Present (4)

Upper-Division Courses: 42 units

ENG 117 Shakespeare (4)

Three of the following: (12)

  • ENG 121 Romantic Literature 1798-1832 (4)
  • ENG 122 Victorian Literature 1832-1900 (4)
  • ENG 151 Milton and the Early 17th Century (4)
  • ENG 152 Chaucer and Medieval Literature (4)
  • ENG 158 Literature of the English Renaissance 1485-1600 (4)
  • ENG 166 Neoclassic Literature 1660-1798 (4)
  • ENG 170 British Novel 1700-Present (4)

Two of the following: (8)

  • ENG 130 Major American Writers to 1865 (4)
  • ENG 131 Major American Writers 1865-1914 (4)
  • ENG 132 Major American Writers 1914-1945 (4)
  • ENG 133 Major American Writers: Special Topics (4)
  • ENG 135 Faulkner (4)

Two of the following: (8)

  • ENG 134 Ethnicity and Race in American Literature (4)
  • ENG 136 Jewish American Literature (4)
  • ENG 160 Women Writers (4)
  • ENG 164 Topics in Classic Literature (4)
  • ENG 165 Topics in World Literature (4)
  • ENG 195 Seminar (4)
  • ENGLISH 98

Two of the following: (8)

  • ENG 181 Twentieth-Century Poetry (4)
  • ENG 182 Twentieth-Century Fiction (4)
  • ENG 183 Twentieth-Century Drama (4)
  • ENG 185 Twentieth-Century Irish Literature (4)
  • ENG 186 British and Irish Theatre (4)

One of the following: (2-6)

  • ENG 197 Comprehensive Examination (2) (Written essay exam to be prepared for
    and taken in the student’s last semester. Students preparing for the exam will be
    expected to review English and American literary history and theory, meeting
    for two hours a week with each other and with different department members
    as appropriate.)
  • ENG 199 Senior Honors Project (6) (Students who elect this choice may
    substitute it for 4 units from the two sets of courses listed immediately above.)

Recommended:

Two of the following: (8)

  • HIS 152 England, 1485 to Present (4)
  • HIS 171 Colonial and Revolutionary America (4)
  • HIS 173 Civil War and Reconstruction America (4)
  • HIS 175 Recent America (4)
  • One of the following: (4)
  • ART 131 Theory and Criticism in the Arts (4)
  • HIS 142 European Intellectual History, 1650-Present (4)
  • PY 135 Philosophy of Language (4)

Any upper-division literature course in a language other than English (4)

Guidelines for Teacher Preparation for Secondary Teachers of English: 54-60 units

Students who hope to teach English at the secondary level in California need to complete the requirements for an English major, using the following recommended course of study, which prepares candidates to take the CSET English exam. The CSET (California Subject Examinations for Teachers) English exam requires knowledge in four domains:

  • literature and textual analysis
  • language, linguistics, and literacy
  • composition and rhetoric
  • communications - speech, media, and creative performance

If approved, England Semester or London Mayterm courses may substitute for the courses listed below.

Literature and Textual Analysis: 32 units

  • ENG 117 Shakespeare (4)

  • Two of the following: (4)

    • ENG 046 Survey of British Literature to 1800 (4)
    • ENG 047 Survey of British Literature 1800-Present (4)
    • ENG 121 Romantic Literature 1798-1832 (4)
    • ENGLISH 99
    • ENG 122 Victorian Literature 1832-Present (4)
    • ENG 151 Milton and the Early 17th Century (4)
    • ENG 152 Chaucer and Medieval Literature (4)
    • ENG 158 Literature of the English Renaissance 1485-1600 (4)
    • ENG 166 Neoclassic Literature 1660-1798 (4)
    • ENG 170 British Novel 1700-1900 (4)

  • Two of the following: (8)

    • ENG 130 Major American Writers to 1865 (4)
    • ENG 131 Major American Writers 1865-1914 (4)
    • ENG 132 Major American Writers 1914-1945 (4)
    • ENG 133 Major American Writers: Special Topics (4)
    • ENG 135 Faulkner (4)

  • Two of the following, including ENG 134 or 160: (8)

    • ENG 044 Studies in World Literature (4)
    • ENG 134 Ethnicity and Race in American Literature (4)
    • ENG 136 Jewish-American Literature (4)
    • ENG 160 Women Writers (4)
    • ENG 165 Studies in World Literature (4)
    • ENG 182 Twentieth-Century Fiction (4)

  • One of the following: (4)

    • ENG 006 Studies in Literature (4)
    • ENG 044 Studies in World Literature (4)
    • ENG 045 Studies in Classic Literature (4)
    • ENG 181 Twentieth-Century Poetry (4)
    • ENG 185 Twentieth-Century Irish Literature (4)
    • ENG 195 Seminar (4)

  • An additional course from the options for British, American, or world literature (above)

    • Language, Linguistics, and Literacy: 8 units
    • ENG 106 Language Acquisition (4)
    • Modern/Foreign Languages (4) – a college-level course in any modern spoken
      language (e.g., Spanish, French, or German) or ancient language (e.g., Greek or
      Hebrew)
    • Composition and Rhetoric: 6-12 units
    • ENG 104 Modern Grammar and Advanced Composition (4)

  • One of the following: (2-4)

    • ENG 002 Composition (4) (unless waived by department-approved alternative)
    • ENG 090 Literary Critical Strategies (4)
    • ENG 167 Writers’ Corner (2)
    • COM 006 Messages, Meaning and Culture (4)
    • SP 100 Advanced Spanish (4)
    • Communications: Speech, Media and Creative Performance: 8 units

  • Two of the following: (8)

    • ENG 087 Introduction to Journalism (4)
    • ENG 101 Film Studies (4)
    • ENG 141 Creative Writing (4) or ENG 142 Workshop in Creative Writing
    • ENGLISH 100
    • ENG 183 Twentieth-Century Drama (4)
    • ENG 186 British and Irish Theatre [England Semester or London Mayterm] (4)
    • COM 015 Public Speaking (4)
    • COM 125 Mass Communication (4)
    • COM 140 Studies in Communication Ethics (4)
    • TA 010 Acting (4)
    • TA 020 Survey of Theatre Arts (4)

In order to complete a fifth-year Credential Program at Westmont, students should also complete eight or more units of the following prior to applying to the program:

  • KNS 156 Health Education for the Classroom Teacher (2)
  • ED 101 Explorations in Teaching (4)
  • ED 105 Perspectives on Cultural Diversity and Education (4)
  • ED 130 Special Education for the Classroom Teacher (2)
  • ED 161 Computers for the Classroom Teacher: Secondary (2)

In many cases, it is possible to complete requirements for the major and the Westmont Credential Program in four years. Such a “fast-track” program requires early planning. Students wishing to complete such a program should refer to more specific advising materials available on the Education Department webpage.
All students wishing to explore secondary teaching are strongly encouraged to consult
with faculty advisors in the Department of Education as early in their undergraduate
program as possible, in addition to consulting with their major advisor.

Requirements for a Minor: 20 units
To satisfy the requirements for an English minor, students must complete 20 units of
English, which must include at least 12 units of literature and at least 12 units of upperdivision
coursework.

Lower-Division Course Descriptions

ENG-002 Composition (4)  Provides practice and critique in a variety of forms of written communication: e.g., reflection, narrative, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and argument. Requires at least six papers that altogether include at least 4000 words of polished writing; one assignment must be a documented research paper. Gives attention to revision processes, to varied purposes and audiences, and to the stewardship of language. (Does not apply to the English major.)

ENG 006 Studies in Literature (4) An exploration of the ways of knowing provided by narrative, poetry and drama. The course invites us to see how literature reveals things we cannot know except by inference or by metaphor. Further, by encouraging us to practice compassion by imagining the other, the course involves us in ways of knowing that are inherently ethical. Content varies; faculty usually
include selections from historically underrepresented writers. Requires at least four formal papers or the equivalent, involving a minimum of sixteen pages of analytic writing.

ENG 006H First-Year Honors Seminar in Literature (4) Prerequisite: By invitation only. A small class of gifted entering students engage in a discussion-based exploration of some of the great literary works of the past and present. Usually includes the opportunity to see Shakespeare plays in live production.

ENG 044 Studies in World Literature (4) Topics in modern and contemporary literature from around the world. Readings may include works by African, Asian, Middle Eastern, Latin American, or Native American writers and range from indigenous work to writing in colonial and post-colonial contexts, including both
literature in translation and Anglophone writers. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

ENG 045 Studies in Classic Literature (4) Topics in classic literature of the Western World. Such topics as classical mythology, Dante, and the Bible as literature may range from genre studies to courses on individual writers and may range in time from the writers of classical antiquity to modern European authors. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

ENG 046 Survey of British Literature to 1800 (4) Historical overview of major authors, genres, and developments from the medieval through the Renaissance, seventeenth-century, and eighteenth-century eras.

ENG 047 Survey of British Literature 1800-Present (4) Historical overview of major authors, genres, and developments in the Romantic, Victorian, Modern and Contemporary periods.

ENG 087 Introduction to Journalism (4) Prerequisite: Completion of the first-year “Writing for the Liberal Arts” requirement. Extensive experience in newsgathering and feature writing. Consideration given to current professional and ethical issues facing the press.

ENG 090 Literary Critical Strategies (4) Prerequisites: one literature course and completion of the first-year writing for the liberal arts requirement. Intensive written practice in methods of analyzing and interpreting works of drama, fiction, or poetry in genre-specific ways, as preparation for upper-division literature courses.

Upper-Division Course Descriptions

ENG 101 Film Studies (4) Prerequisite: one literature course and completion of the first-year “Writing for the Liberal Arts” requirement. Consideration of film as a narrative and visual medium. Includes practice in analysis of plot structure, theme, symbolism, and literary sources.

ENG 104 Modern Grammar and Advanced Composition (4) Prerequisite:
completion of the first-year “Writing for the Liberal Arts” requirement. Strategies and practice in writing non-fiction, expository prose. Special emphasis on revision and style. Includes mini-lessons, peer editing, in-class writing, workshops, and oral presentations.

ENG 105 History and Structure of English (4) Prerequisite: ENG 046. History of the language including modern developments in grammar and Anglophone dialects.

ENG 106 Language Acquisition (4) An examination of the basic structures of English usage and the process of acquiring and developing a first and second language. Course includes historical and current theories of language acquisition as well as teaching methodologies. Satisfies major requirement.

ENG 111 Screenwriting I (4) Prerequisites: ENG 006, completion of the first-year writing requirement, and instructor consent. Introduction to theory and technique of dramatic writing for film and TV. Offered in fall semesters.

ENG 112 Screenwriting II (4) Prerequisite: ENG 111. Fundamentals of screenwriting focusing on conflict and character, structure, scenes, dialogue, and dramatic action. Alternates with ENG 113 in spring semesters.

ENG 113 Screenwriting III (4) Prerequisite: ENG 111. Examination of methods of adapting fiction and non-fiction material to film and TV.

ENG 117 Shakespeare (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. Representative comedies, histories, and tragedies.

ENG 121 Romantic Literature 1798-1832 (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. Poetry, prose, and drama of the major and other authors of the Romantic period from Blake to Keats.

ENG 122 Victorian Literature 1832-1900 (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. Readings from novelists including the Brontës, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy; and poets such as Arnold, the Brownings, and Tennyson, along with less-remembered literary figures.

ENG 130 Major American Writers to 1865 (4) Major achievements of the American Renaissance by Hawthorne and Melville in fiction, Emerson and Thoreau in prose non-fiction, and Whitman in poetry.

ENG 131 Major American Writers 1865-1914 (4) Masters of American realism–Mark Twain, James, and Howells; Dickinson and other forerunners of modern poetry; and such early 20th century authors as Wharton and Dreiser.

ENG 132 Major American Writers 1914-1945 (4) Masterpieces of such 20th century novelists as Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Cather; poetry of Frost and Eliot; plays of O’Neill and T. Williams.

ENG 133 Major American Writers: Special Topics (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. Intensive study of one topic in American letters such as Southern writers, the expatriate writers, Jewish-American writers, contemporary novelists, or a single author.

ENG 134 Ethnicity and Race in American Literature (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. Explorations of traditions in America’s diverse cultural literatures, and literary representations of relations between and within different ethnic and racial groups. Texts and emphases vary.

ENG 135 Faulkner (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. A study of the writer who attracts more critical attention than any writer in English except Shakespeare and Chaucer. The seminar explores the way Faulkner creates a literary world on his postage-stamp of Yoknapatawpha soil in such major works as Absalom, Absalom! As I Lay Dying, The Sound and the Fury, and Go Down, Moses.

ENG 136 Jewish-American Literature (4) An exploration of selected literature related to the history, traditions, and life of Jewish people in twentieth-century America. Emphases include assimilation, the Holocaust, and the changing voice in Jewish-American literature after World War II. Writers studied include Singer, West, Roth, Wallant, Salinger, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, and Potok.

ENG 141 Creative Writing (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses. Theory and practice of writing poetry, fiction, and drama.

ENG 142 Workshop in Creative Writing (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses. Workshop in creative writing in a single genre, such as poetry, prose fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction. May be repeated for credit as genres vary.

ENG 151 Milton and the Early 17th Century (4) Prerequisite: ENG 046 or 117. Poetry, prose, and drama from Jonson to Milton.

ENG 152 Chaucer and Medieval Literature (4) Prerequisite: ENG 046. Old English texts in translation; Chaucer and other Middle English authors in the original.

ENG 158 Literature of the English Renaissance 1485-1600 (4) Prerequisite: ENG 046 or 117. Poetry, prose, and drama from Malory to Spenser, excluding Shakespeare.

ENG 160 Women Writers (4) Writing by women in a variety of genres, arranged chronologically or thematically to focus on questions related to gender, class, race, and spirituality. With instructor’s permission, may be repeated for credit as topics vary.

ENG 164 Topics in Classic Literature (4) Advanced study of topics ranging from the writers of classical antiquity to modern European authors. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

ENG 165 Topics in World Literature (4) May focus on major figures or on a special topic in world literature in translation (such as visionary literature), or on an emerging field such as Anglophone poetry or post-colonial fiction. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.


ENG 166 Neoclassic Literature 1660-1798 (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. English literature from the Augustan Age and the 18th century, including Restoration drama, satire, heroic verse, periodical essays, and the rise of the novel, by writers such as Bunyan, Dryden, Behn, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Burney, and Fielding.

ENG 167 Writers’ Corner (2) Prerequisite: by invitation. A course in composition theory and pedagogy that establishes a community of scholar-practitioners among students who work at Writers’ Corner and equips them with the training needed to serve as effective writing tutors.

ENG 168 Student Publications: Horizon (1-4) Prerequisite: ENG 087. Semesterlong course of experiential learning in news writing, and perhaps in editing, page layout or photography, and production of a student newspaper. The editor-in-chief may receive 4 units per semester, section editors may receive 2 units per semester, and other staff may receive one unit per semester. (A maximum of 4 units of publication credit may apply toward the English major.) P/NC grading only, unless letter grading is approved by instructor.

ENG 169 Student Publications: Phoenix (1-2) Supervised experience in editing the student literary magazine, the Phoenix, published in April of each year. The editor or co-editors may receive 2 units per semester and assistant editors may receive 1 unit per semester. Offered spring semester only. (A maximum of 4 units of publication credit may apply toward the English major.)

ENG 170 British Novel 1700-Present (4) Prerequisites: two literature courses or consent of instructor. A study of the British novel from its origins to the present. While closely tending to the works of novelists such as Behn, Defoe, Burney, Fielding, Austen, Scott, Brontë, Eliot, Dickens, Hardy, Joyce, Forster and Woolf, the course will also consider questions about the novel as a genre, about the novel’s
place in British culture, and about shifting understandings of the term “British” in relation to the novel.

ENG 181 Twentieth-Century Poetry (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. British and American poetry by such major poets as Hopkins, Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Bishop and Williams with some works from more recent poets.


ENG 182 Twentieth-Century Fiction (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. British, European, Commonwealth and Third World novelists and short story writers of the 20th century.

ENG 183 Twentieth-Century Drama (4) Prerequisite: one literature course or consent of instructor. British, American and European works by such major playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, O’Neill, Beckett, Miller, Stoppard, Lorraine Hansberry, August Wilson, Brian Friel, and Caryl Churchill. Field trips to
performances of both new and established plays.

ENG 185 Twentieth-Century Irish Literature (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. An examination of modern and contemporary Irish literature of the 20th century. The post-colonial crafting of a national identity by writers from Yeats, Joyce, and Synge to Heaney and Friel—and the reexamination of that identity by more recent women writers from Eavan Boland to Nuala Ní
Dhomhnaill, Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Christina Reid and Marina Carr.

ENG 186 British and Irish Theatre I (4) Study of plays available in live production in London, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Dublin ranging from Shakespeare to modern classics to world premieres. Offered on England Semester in even-numbered years and on London Theatre Mayterm in odd-numbered years.

ENG 187 British and Irish Theatre II (4) Study of plays available in live production in London, Stratford-upon-Avon, and Dublin ranging from Shakespeare to modern classics to world premieres. Offered on London Theatre Mayterm in oddnumbered years.

ENG 190 Practicum (1-4) Internships related to English at a variety of employers in Santa Barbara or San Francisco. Such experiential learning is set in context through reflection, both in writing and in discussion, on the significance of the experience. The San Francisco Urban Internship Program offers opportunities to select internship experiences in journalism and writing, editorial work with publishing houses, or in teaching English as a second language. Internships in journalism, writing, or editing have a prerequisite of ENG 087 for students to receive English credit. A maximum of 4 units of practicum credit may apply toward the English major.

ENG 191SS Reading in the Community (0) (Co-requisite: enrollment in an upperdivision literature course) Students receive help and training in the art of oral interpretation and read selections of the literature they are studying to an elderly or otherwise underserved person or audience for an hour a week. Fulfills the General Education expectation of Serving Society. (P/NC grading only)

ENG 195 Seminar (4) Prerequisite: two literature courses or consent of instructor. Advanced study on a single author or topic such as literary theory, satire, or literature of place. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 197 Comprehensive Examination (2) Weekly seminar in English and American literary history and theory in preparation for a written essay exam.