T-shirt History

 

Beginning with the 15th annual contest in 2001, Westmont has given complimentary T-shirts to participating students and teachers. Following is a depiction of the designs used each year. The designs are meant to connect with the number of years the contest has run.

 


2001—15th Annual Contest
A combinatorial identity.

 


2002—16th Annual Contest
A hypercube with its 16 vertices.

 


2003—17th Annual Contest
Gauss’ construction of a regular 17-gong.

 


2004—18th Annual Contest
A Celtic knot with 18 crossings.

 


2005—19th Annual Contest
Front: a design illustrating that 19 is a hexagonal number.

 


2005—19th Annual Contest
Back: a formula for Hn, the nth hexagonal number, with H2 = 19.

 


2006—20th Annual Contest
Front: a net for an icosahedron.

 


2006—20th Annual Contest
Back: an icosahedron and a formula for its volume.

 


2008—21st Annual Contest
Binet’s formula for Fibonacci numbers gives F8 = 21.

 


2009—22nd Annual Contest
Maximum number of pieces when cutting a pizza 6 times = 22.

 


2010—23rd Annual Contest
Relation between 23, e, and π; a skeletal proof showing why πe < eπ.

 


2011—24th Annual Contest
A Cayley graph depicting α and β as generators of S4, which has 24 elements.

 


2012—25th Annual Contest
Prime factorization reveals that only perfect squares have an odd number of factors.

 


2013—26th Annual Contest
Front: a net for a rhombicuboctahedron.

 


2013—26th Annual Contest
Back: a rhombicuboctahedron with its 26 faces.

  Here is a video demo that creates a rhombicuboctahedron from its net.

 


2014—27th Annual Contest
A cube (volume = 27) progresses towards a Menger sponge (fractal dimension ≈ 2.7).

 


2016—28th Annual Contest
Euclid’s Proposition IX.36, with n=3, implies that 28 is a perfect number.
For a detailed explanation of the T-shirt, click here.

 


2017—29th Annual Contest
Maximum number of pieces when cutting a pizza 7 times = 29.
For a detailed explanation of the T-shirt, click here.