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Welcome
Introduction
Language Laboratory
Goals

Languages
French
German
Spanish
English-Modern Languages

Faculty
Mary Blackwood Collier
Mary Docter
Leonor Elías


Westmont College
Modern Languages
955 La Paz Road
Santa Barbara, CA 93108
805.565.6079
languages@westmont.edu
CATALOG

English-Modern Languages

 Description of the Major. Westmont offers regular modern language courses in French, German Studies, and Spanish. These courses emphasize communication skills at the elementary and intermediate levels. Beyond the classroom, regularly scheduled drill sessions and the use of the language laboratory encourage the development of skills. Students learn about the culture and civilization through reading selected portions of literature as well as through a variety of media. The College offers upper-division courses and majors in French and Spanish. In these programs students study masterpieces of the literature and discuss them in their original languages.

 Distinctive Features. Personally acquainted with the culture of the languages they teach, the professors incorporate personal experiences and insights in lectures and discussions. Small class sizes, close student-faculty relationships, a well-equipped language laboratory, and a flexible curriculum all contribute to fulfilling students' needs and demands in studying modern languages and their literature.

 Career Choices. Becoming proficient in a second language and understanding people of another culture are competencies valuable in any profession or career. They can help us live and move in the global community as attractive and articulate witnesses for Christ. In every field, including foreign missions, domestic human services agencies, business, education, government, and the arts, there is a need for people capable of communicating meaningfully with others.

Requirements for a Major: 36 units

ENG 117 Shakespeare (4)
Literature Survey: Two courses selected from one of the following categories (8)
A. British Literature

ENG 46 Survey of British Literature to 1800 (4)
ENG 47 Survey of British Literature 1800-Present (4)
OR
B. American Literature - Two of the following:
ENG 130 Major American Writers to 1865 (4)
ENG 131 Major American Writers 1865-1914 (4)
ENG 132 Major American Writers 1914-1945 (4)
ENG 133 Major American Writers: Special Topics (4)
Two upper-division electives in English Literature (8)
Four upper-division literature courses in a Single Foreign Language (16)

Sample Four-Year Program

FIRST YEAR
Fall Spring
ENG 46 (4) ENG 47 (4)
FR 1 or SP 1 (4) FR 2 or SP 2 (4)
RS 10 or 20 (4) RS 10 or 20 (4)
Distribution/Elective (4) Distribution/Elective (4)
PEA 32 (1) PEA Elective (1)
SECOND YEAR
Fall Spring
ENG 117 (4) ENG 131 (4)
FR 3 or SP 3 (4) FR 4 or SP 4 (4)
RS 1 (4) Distribution/Elective (8)
Distribution/Elective (4) PEA Elective (1)
PEA Elective (1)
THIRD YEAR
Fall Spring
FR or SP Literature (4) FR or SP Literature (4)
Upper-Division RS requirement (4) ENG 183 (4)
Distribution/Elective (8) Distribution/Elective (8)
FOURTH YEAR
Fall Spring
FR or SP Literature (4) FR or SP Literature (4)
Distribution/Elective (12) Distribution/Elective (8)

Course Descriptions

French
(see French major)

German Studies

 GS 1, 2 Introductory German (4,4) Introduces students to various aspects of the German-speaking world as a way of enabling them to begin building communicative abilities in German in reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course incorporates a variety of activities through diverse collaborative and individual tasks in the learning of major sentence patterns and grammatical features of German, as well as integration of current technology (e.g., computer programs, the Internet, e-mail, video and film). Offered fall and spring semesters, respectively. (GE)
GS 3, 4 Intermediate German (4,4) Building on Introductory German (GS 1-2), students increase their accuracy in German, their fluency, and their ability to express themselves in a greater range of topics. The foundation in reading, writing, listening, and speaking is strengthened by more extended work, inside and outside the class. Aspects of grammar are reviewed, expanded, or introduced in a functional approach that is related to the diverse texts (current and past and from a variety of genres, including poetry and drama). As with the GS 1 & 2 courses, current technology is part of the pedagogy of these courses. (GE)

Spanish

(see Spanish major)

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