The Gaede Institute cosponsors a variety of faculty-organized lecture series: the Pascal Society Lectures, which engage questions of science and faith; the Erasmus Society Lectures, which bring to campus leading scholars in the humanities; two annual lectures organized by Westmont's chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi honors society; special World Christianity, Gender Studies, and departmental lectures; and its own Reel Talk film discussion series. To add these events to your Google Calendar, follow this link, then click the small + icon in the bottom-right corner of the page. Unless otherwise noted, events are free and open to the public.

 

Current Semester | Spring 2016 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2014

 


Fall 2016 Lectures and Events

Dave Tell

The Emmett Till Memory Project

Thursday, September 8, 2016, 7:00pm

Adams 216


David Sherman

Threats and Affirmations: The Interplay of Self and Social Identity

Friday, September 9, 2016, 3:30pm

Winter 210


Alister Chapman

Immigration: The Best Thing for Britain Since Sliced Bread?

Monday, September 12, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge


Paul Cronshaw

Sustainable Beekeeping 101

Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 3:30pm

Founders Dining Room


Frank Wolf and Tony P. Hall

Friendship Across the Aisle: Bipartisanship in Pursuit of Justice, Human Rights, and Religious Freedom

Thursday, September 15, 2016, 12:00pm

Winter 210


Derek Muller

From Adams v. Jefferson to Trump v. Clinton: Elections and the Framers' Constitution

Monday, September 19, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge


Amanda Sparkman, Meredith Whitnah, Sameer Yadav

Panel Discussion: What is Gender?

Tuesday, September 20, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

Kristen Deede Johnson
All Things New: Justice and Our Calling
Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 3:30pm
Hieronymus Lounge


Nocturnal

Staged reading of a play by Juan Mayorga, directed by Mitchell Thomas

Thursday, September 22, 7:00pm

Porter Theater

Jon Huckins

Global Peacemaking as Discipleship: Lessons from Welcoming the Stranger

Tuesday, September 27, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Reel Talk: "Who Is Dayani Cristal?"

with members of the 2016 US Border Immersion Faculty Seminar

Thursday, September 29, 7:00pm

Adams 216

 

Angela D'Amour

How Christian Women Envision Their Future

Monday, October 3, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

Ṣuhnaz Yilmaz

Challenges to Turkish-American Relations in a Turbulent Middle East

Wednesday, October 5, 3:15pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Kya Mangrum

American Slavery As It Is? Word, Image, and the Desire for the Crime Scene Photograph in U.S. Anti-Slavery Literature, 1830-1839

Thursday, October 13, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge


Kathi King

How to Reduce your Carbon Footprint TODAY

Friday, October 14, 3:30pm

Founders Dining Room


Nicholas Wolterstorff

Empathy and Anger in the Struggle Against Injustice

Monday, October 17, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

P. Matthew Joyner

Investigation of the Bioactivity of Native American Medicinal Plants of Southern California

Friday, October 21, 3:30pm

Winter 210

 

Reel Talk: Focus Week

Thursday, October 27, 7pm

Film and panel to be announced

 

Letters from Cuba

Staged reading of a play by Maria Irene Fornes, directed by Lindsey Twigg

Thursday, November 3, 7:00pm

Porter Theater


Salty Girl Seafood

Sustainability at Salty Girl Seafood

Wednesday, November 9, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge


Angela Reed

Spiritual Companioning in Protestant Theology and Practice

Thursday, November 10, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge


Prasannan Parthasarathi

South Asian Cottons and the World

Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Reel Talk: "Gattaca"

with Tim Van Haitsma and Eileen McMahon McQuade

Thursday, December 1, 7:00pm

Porter Theater


Ellie Perry

Sustainability Across the Spectrum

Tuesday, December 6, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge



 

The Emmett Till Memory Project


tellDave Tell

Associate Professor of Communication Studies, University of Kansas

 

Erasmus Lecture (Communication Studies)

Thursday, September 8, 2016, 7pm

Adams 216

 

For fifty years following the 1955 murder of Emmett Till, there was not a single commemorative marker anywhere in the state of Mississippi. Since 2005, however, the state has invested nearly $5 million in Till commemoration. In this talk, Dr. Dave Tell reveals the untold stories, backroom deals, ethical quandaries, and outright scandals that have attended this sudden explosion in commemorative activity.

 

Dave Tell is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas. His 2012 book, Confessional Crises: Confession and Cultural Politics in Twentieth-Century America, explains how the genre of confession has shaped (and been shaped by) some of the twentieth century's most intractable issues: sexuality, class, race, violence, religion, and democracy. He holds a Ph.D. in Communication Studies from Penn State. www.coms.ku.edu

 

 

Threats and Affirmations: The Interplay of Self and Social Identity


Dave Sherman PhotoDavid Sherman

Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, UC Santa Barbara

 

Natural and Behavioral Sciences Lecture

Friday, September 9, 2016, 3:30pm

Winter 210

 

David Sherman holds a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Health Psychology at UCLA. Since 2005, he has been a faculty member in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at UCSB. His research, which is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, centers on how people respond to information and events that threaten the self. www.psych.ucsb.edu


 

Immigration: The Best Thing for Britain Since Sliced Bread?


Alister Chapman

Professor of History, Westmont College

Responses by Heather Keaney and Charles Farhadian

 

 

Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture

Monday, September 12, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

As nationalistic energies grow in the United States and Europe, questions about immigration, Islamic terrorism, and national decline have gained new prominence. But the fear of cultural dissolution might be overblown. In a talk examining postwar immigration to the city of Derby, England, Alister Chapman makes the case that, despite a large influx of immigrants from South Asia and the Caribbean, strong cultural continuities have persisted. In the case of the city's churches, growing diversity might even have strengthened the character and force of Christian expression. Alister Chapman is a professor of history at Westmont College.

 

The Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture Series is a primary venue for on-campus presentation of research by Westmont faculty. The series brings together faculty, staff, students, alumni, and the local community to consider a significant piece of peer-reviewed scholarship, as well as two formal faculty responses.

 

 

Sustainable Beekeeping 101


Paul Cronshaw

President, Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association

 

 

Sustainability Speaker Series

Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 3:30pm

Founders Dining Room

 

Beekeeping is an increasingly popular way for urban and suburban homes to produce delicious food while contributing to local agriculture and ecosystems. Paul “The Beeman” Cronshaw has been keeping honeybees in Santa Barbara County since 1971. He set up his first hive on the roof of his parent’s house, purchased his first hive equipment from the Sears catalog, and ordered a package of bees from Mississippi. Since then he has been following his passion for honeybees by teaching beekeeping classes to adults and youth, maintaining apiaries in the Santa Barbara area, removing and relocating honeybees humanely from structures, and recently starting a Host A Hive program to promote the urban beekeeping movement. www.sbaa.org/about.

 

The Sustainability Speaker Series brings to campus local leaders whose work exemplifies responsible stewardship of natural resources. New for 2016-2017, the series is jointly sponsored by the Westmont Garden and Sustainability Club and the Gaede Institute for the Liberal Arts.

 

 

Friendship Across the Aisle: Bipartisanship in Pursuit of Justice, Human Rights, and Religious Freedom


Congressman Frank Wolf and Ambassador Tony P. Hall

 

 

Political Science Lecture

Thursday, September 15, 2016, 12:00pm

Winter 210

 

For decades on Capitol Hill, Frank Wolf (R-VA) and Tony Hall (D-OH) worked on different sides of the aisle. But as longtime prayer partners, they've also discovered shared purposes that transcend political affiliation. In a lunchtime conversation, Wolf and Hall discuss their substaintial work together on a wide range of issues, including poverty and hunger, human trafficking, and religious persecution.

 

This Political Science Department lecture is sponsored by the American Enterprise Institute’s Values & Capitalism Project.

 

 

From Adams v. Jefferson to Trump v. Clinton: Elections and the Framers' Constitution


Derek Muller

Pepperdine University

 

 

Constitution Day Lecture

Monday, September 19, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Derek Muller is an associate professor of law at Pepperdine University. Specializing in electoral law, Dr. Muller's work has treated federalism and the role of the states in the administration of elections. His work has appeared in the Arizona Law ReviewIndiana Law Journal, the Arizona State Law Journal, the Florida State University Law Review, the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, and the peer-reviewed Election Law Journal. law.pepperdine.edu

 

Funding for this lecture is provided by the John Templeton Foundation through a grant from the Institute for Humane Studies.

 

 

Panel Discussion: What is Gender?


westmont sealAmanda Sparkman, Meredith Whitnah, Sameer Yadav

Westmont College

 

Gender Studies Lecture

Tuesday, September 20, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Join Westmont faculty as they explore the nature of gender from three disciplinary perspectives. Amanda Sparkman (biology), Meredith Whitnah (sociology) and Sameer Yadav (religious studies) anchor an interactive panel discussion co-sponsored by the Gender Studies program and the Westmont Feminist Society.

 

 

All Things New: Justice and Our Calling


justiceKristen Deede Johnson
Western Theological Seminary

 

Sociology Department and NetVUE Initiative Lecture

Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

God promises that in Christ He is making all things new. This means that every injustice in this world will be overcome and every wrong set right through the reconciling love of Jesus Christ. In the meanwhile, we still see brokenness and injustice all around the world, including in our lives and in the church. What does this mean for our callings right here and right now? How do we receive God’s passion for justice and allow it to shape how we live and serve in our jobs, communities, churches, and families? Drawing on her recent book, which was written in partnership with International Justice Mission and offers a comprehensive biblical theology of justice, Kristen Deede Johnson will help us consider ways in which we today can weave God's commitment to justice more deeply into our lives and callings.

 

 

Boundary Crossings: Nocturnal


Nocturnal Staged reading of a play by Juan Mayorga, directed by Mitchell Thomas

 

Boundary Crossings: New International Plays about the Immigrant Experience

Thursday, September 22, 2016, 7:00pm

Porter Theater

 

Sponsored by the Westmont Theatre Arts Department, Boundary Crossings features staged readings of works by international playwrights about immigration and the immigrant experience. In the opening performance, Westmont professor Mitchell Thomas directs Nocturnal, Juan Mayorga's satire about insomnia and the loneliness of a big city.

 

 

Global Peacemaking as Discipleship: Lessons from Welcoming the Stranger


HuckinsJon Huckins

Director, The Global Immersion Project

 

Office of Global Studies Lecture

Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

How can ordinary people be peacemakers? Jon Huckins, co-founding director of the Global Immersion Project, explores the ways that all Christians can be agents of reconciliation, both in their neighborhoods and in regions of the world that experience deep conflict and suffering. Huckins writes and speaks about peacemaking in a variety of venues, and has published in Red Letter Christians, Sojourners, and RELEVANT. He holds a Master of Arts degree from Fuller Theological Seminary.

 

 

Reel Talk: "Who is Dayani Cristal?"


Who is Dayani Cristal?with Mary Docter, Jason Cha, Rachel Winslow, Rachel Fabian, and Liz Robertson

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 7:00pm

Adams 216

 

Since 2001, more than 2,100 people have died attempting to cross the Sonora Desert into Arizona. "Who is Daynia Cristal?" takes viewers inside this brutal, often dehumanizing experience, tracing the journey of one young Guatamalan father who migrates north in search of money to care for a sick child. In a film that combines documentary and dramatic approaches, actor and activist Gael Garcia Bernal embeds himself on the Central American migrant trail, learning what it might have been like for this man who died, anonymously, in Arizona's "corridor of death." Politics aside, the filmmakers argue, the volume of mortality in the desert demands a response. Following the film, Mark Sargent hosts a conversation with participants in Westmont's 2016 Border Experience Faculty Mayterm.

 

 

How Christian Women Envision Their Future


Angela D'AmourAngela D'Amour

Director of Campus Life, Westmont College

 

Gender Studies Lecture

Monday, October 3, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

How do women at Christian colleges think about their future selves? What factors--in their campus community, in their faith background, in society at large--influence those projections and plans? Westmont's own Director of Campus Life, Angela D'Amour, explores these questions, drawing from her dissertation research at UCSB's Gevirtz School of Education, where she earned a PhD in 2015. In addition to her doctorate, D'Amour holds a M.Ed. in Higher Education from the University of Vermont and B.S. in psychology from Westmont.

 

 

Challenges to Turkish-American Relations in a Turbulent Middle East


yilmaz Ṣuhnaz Yilmaz

Assistant Professor of International Relations, Koç University, Istanbul

Visiting Professor, UCLA

 

History Department Lecture

Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 3:15pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Şuhnaz Yılmaz Özbağcı is a visiting professor at UCLA with a dual appointment at the Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Luskin Center for Innovation. She is also an associate professor of international relations at Koç University, Istanbul. Her recent research focuses on the international affairs of the Middle East, foreign policy analysis, Turkish foreign policy, international security and European security and foreign policy, Euro-Mediterranean relations, Eurasian politics, energy politics, and Turkish-EU-US Relations.

 

 

American Slavery As It Is? Word, Image, and the Desire for the Crime Scene Photograph in U.S. Anti-Slavery Literature, 1830-1839


Kya MangumKya Mangrum

Assistant Professor of English, University of Utah

 

Erasmus Lecture

Thursday, October 13, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Kya Mangrum is an assistant professor of English at the University of Utah, where she specializes in visual studies, African American literature, and African American visual culture. Prior to coming to Utah, Mangrum was a Mellon Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell University. She holds a PhD in English from the University of Michigan.

 

 

 

How to Reduce your Carbon Footprint TODAY


Kathy KingKathi King

Director of Outreach and Education, Santa Barbara Environmental Council

 

Sustainability Speaker Series

Friday, October 14, 2016, 3:30pm

Founders Dining Room

 

Kathi King is the director of outreach and education programs at Santa Barbara's Community Environmental Council. She is involved in a variety of public environmental programming in the tri-county area, including the Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival, CEC's Green Gala, and the "Rethink the Drink" bottle reduction program in area schools. Ms. King worked for several years in the LA television industry, where she was an associate producer of the popular sitcom “Full House.”

 

 

Empathy and Anger in the Struggle Against Injustice


Nicolas WolterstorffNicholas Wolterstorff

Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University

 

Erasmus Lecture (Philosophy)

Monday, October 17, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

Most people who struggle against some particular case of injustice are energized to do so by emotional engagement with the victims or the perpetrators: empathy with the victims or anger at the perpetrators - or both. But almost always there are also people who are acquainted with the plight of victims but feel neither empathy with them nor anger at the perpetrators. Why is that? What blocks empathy and anger? What accounts for "hardening of the heart?" Nicholas Wolterstorff is the Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology at Yale University.

 

 

Investigation of the Bioactivity of Native American Medicinal Plants of Southern California


P. Matthew Joyner PhotoP. Matthew Joyner

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Pepperdine University

 

Natural and Behavioral Sciences Lecture

Friday, October 21, 2016, 3:30pm

Winter 210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boundary Crossings: Letters from Cuba


Letters from CubaStaged reading of a play by Maria Irene Fornes, directed by Lindsey Twigg

Boundary Crossings: New International Plays About the Immigrant Experience

Thursday, November 3, 2016, 7:00pm

Porter Theater

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainability at Salty Girl Seafood


Salty Girl Seafood LogoSalty Girl Seafood

Santa Barbara, CA

 

Sustainability Speaker Series

Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spiritual Companioning in Protestant Theology and Practice


Dr. Angela Reed PhotoAngela Reed

Assistant Professor of Practical Theology, Truett Theological Seminary, Baylor University

Winner of the 2016 Martin Institute/Dallas Willard Center Book Award

 

Provost's Lecture

Thursday, November 10, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Asian Cottons and the World


Prasannan Parthasarathi PhotoPrasannan Parthasarathi

Professor of History, Boston College

 

Erasmus Lecture

Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 7:00pm

Hieronymus Lounge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reel Talk: "Gattaca"


Gattacawith Tim Van Haitsma and Eileen McMahon McQuade

 

Thursday, December 1, 2016, 7:00pm

Porter Theater

 

In social media, in the college and career process, in a burgeoning genetics field--the idea that precise engineering of our lives is possible and desirable has achieved unprecedented power. The dystopian thriller "Gattaca" imagines a world in which such engineering has produced a race of ideal human specimens (think Uma Thurman and Jude Law), a new norm by which all lesser beings (think Ethan Hawke) are judged. In a society devoted to a very narrow vision of perfection, Hawke's character struggles to realize a sense of worth and identity--indeed, to steal it. Following the film, the Gaede Institute's Aaron Sizer hosts a conversation with Eileen McMahon, professor of biology and a specialist in human genetics, and Tim Van Haitsma, professor of kinesiology.

 

 

Sustainability Across the Spectrum


Ellie Perry PhotoEllie Perry

Sundowner Sustainability Consulting

 

Sustainability Speaker Series

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 3:30pm

Hieronymus Lounge