The Gaede Institute co-sponsors a variety of faculty-organized lecture series: the Pascal Society Lectures, which engage questions of science and faith; the Erasmus Society Lectures, which bring to campus leading scholars in the humanities; two annual lectures organized by Westmont's chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi honors society; and special World Christianity, Gender Studies, and departmental lectures. Videos of recent events may be viewed below. For older lectures, please visit our archive (Spring 2015 | Fall 2014). To add these events to your Google Calendar, follow this link, then click the small + icon in the bottom-right corner of the page. Unless otherwise noted, events are free and open to the public.

 


Fall 2015 Lectures

Dane Goodman and Keith Puccinelli
Artists' Talk: "tug"
September 23, 2015, 6:30 p.m. | Adams 216

Jessica Evert
"The Role of Global Health in Social Change and Development"
September 24, 2015, 2 p.m.| Winter 210

Caryn Reeder
"From Boko Haram to Biblical Israel: Deuteronomy 21:10-14 and Wartime Rape"
September 28, 2015, 7 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Rafia Zakaria
Lecture
Date, time, and location to be announced

Heather Keaney
"Tyrants, Terrorists, and Tropes in Islamic History"

October 6, 2015, 7 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Meredith Whitnah
"Faith and the Fragility of Justice: Religious Responses to Gender-Based Violence in South Africa"
October 19, 2015, 7 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Brian Johnson
"The Role of Higher Education in the Religious Transformation of W.E.B. Du Bois and Implications for the 21st Century Academy"
October 21, 7 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Diana Small
"A Conversation with Playwright Diana Small"
October 23, 6 p.m. | Porter Patio

Kraig Beyerlein
"Flooding the Desert: Faith-Based Mobilizing to Save Lives Along the Arizona-Sonora Border"
October 26, 3:30 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Gary Young
Poetry Reading
October 29, 7 p.m. | Adams 216

 

Jack Sasson
Westmont-UCSB Hebrew Bible Lecture

November 4, 2015| Time and location to be announced

Stephen Prothero
"Why Liberals Win the Culture Wars"
November 11, 2015, 3:30 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Robert Emmons
"The Science of Gratitutde"
November 12, 2015, 7 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Jamie Friedman
"Unknowing Yde: Towards a Trans-Christian Hermeneutic"
November 16, 2015, 7 p.m. | Adams 216

Robin Wang
"Yinyang: The Way of Ways"
November 18, 2015, 3:30 p.m. | Hieronymus Lounge

Tracy McKenzie
"Remembering the First Thanksgiving: How to Learn from the Pilgrims without Using and Abusing Them"
November 19, 2015 | Hieronymus Lounge

 

 

Artists' Talk: tug


tug postcardDane Goodman and Keith Puccinelli

Artists

 

Art Department / Ridley-Tree Museum of Art Lecture

Wednesday, September 23, 6:30 p.m.

Adams Center for the Visual Arts, Room 216

 

Goodman and Puccinelli’s art is often tough. The prints, drawings, sculptures, and installation pieces in this exhibition address racial and gender stereotypes, war and violence, the environment, the consequences of poverty, and so much more. The works are charged with the artistic duo’s signature stinging and uncomfortable humor, always used as a tool of social commentary. Coincident with the opening of their new show at the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art, come hear these gifted Santa Barbara artists in conversation about their work.

 

 

The Role of Global Health in Social Change and Development


evertJessica Evert

Executive Director, Child Family Health International

 

Office of Global Education Lecture

Thursday, September 24, 2 p.m.

Winter Hall Room 210

 

Dr. Jessica Evert is the executive director of Child Family Health International and faculty in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. A graduate of the Ohio State University College of Medicine, she is a longtime advocate for health-related international education quality and ethical standards. Her books include the seminal texts Developing Global Health Programs and Global Health Education: A Guidebook. Dr. Evert is a recipient of Global Health Education Consortium's prestigious Christopher Krogh Award for her dedication to underserved populations at home and abroad.

 

 

From Boko Haram to Biblical Israel: Deuteronomy 21:10-14 and Wartime Rape


keaneyCaryn Reeder

Associate Professor of New Testament, Westmont College

 

Gender Studies Lecture

Monday, September 28, 7 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Dr. Caryn Reeder has taught in the Religious Studies department at Westmont College since 2007. Her research interests range from the family and violence in the Bible and biblical worlds, to the interpretations of biblical texts in modern churches, to women's interpretations of biblical texts throughout history. Holding degrees from Augustana College, Wheaton College, and the University of Cambridge, Dr. Reeder recently returned from a year of sabbatical study in Israel and Palestine.

 

 

The Upstairs Wife: An Intimate History of Pakistan


zakariaRafia Zakaria

Reporter, Al Jazeera America

 

Provost's and Office of Global Education Lecture

Thursday, October 1, 3:30 p.m.

Winter Hall Room 210

 

Rafia Zakaria is a human rights lawyer, writer, and reporter for Al Jazerra America. In her acclaimed recent book The Upstairs Wife, Zakaria brings together personal and national histories to paint an elegant portrait of her home country, Pakistan. As she reflects on the interrelationships of marriage, family, and culture, she conveys a sense of deep embeddedness in a particular time and place. Her family's and her nation's pasts are, as she writes,"knotted and inextricable, inside and out, male and female, no longer separate."

 

 

Tyrants, Terrorists, and Tropes in Islamic History


keaneyHeather Keaney

Associate Professor of History, Westmont College

 

Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture

Tuesday, October 6, 7 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Dr. Heather Keaney teaches and writes on Islamic history and the contemporary Islamic world, and is enthusiastic about helping students place headlines in their historical and cultural context in order to reveal their human dimension. Her book Medieval Islamic Historiography: Remembering Rebellion analyzes portrayals of the first Islamic civil war, focusing on historical and ongoing religio-political debates over pursuing justice versus maintaining the unity of the community. She is currently interested in how al-Azhar positioned itself on this debate in the midst of the Arab Spring. She spent many years living and working in Cairo, Egypt and is the co-director of the "Westmont in Istanbul" study-abroad semester.

 

 

Faith and the Fragility of Justice: Religious Responses to Gender-Based Violence in South Africa


smallMeredith Whitnah

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Westmont College

 

Gender Studies Lecture

Monday, October 19, 7 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Meredith Whitnah completed her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Notre Dame in 2015, specializing in gender, religion, culture, and social theory. She studies the role of religion in both perpetuating and mitigating different forms of social injustice. Her current research investigates how faith-based NGOs in South Africa that had resisted apartheid have addressed gender-based violence over time.

 

 

The Role of Higher Education in the Religious Transformation of W.E.B. DuBois and Implications for the 21st-Century Academy


johnsonBrian Johnson

President, Tuskegee University

 

Provost's Lecture

Wednesday, October 21, 7 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Dr. Brian L. Johnson is the seventh President of Tuskegee University. With interests in faith, philanthropy, literature and the African American experience, Dr. Johnson has a long record of distinguished service in higher education. He is the author and editor of seven scholarly books, including W.E.B. Du Bois: Toward Agnosticism and Du Bois on Reform: Periodical-Based Leadership for African Americans. He holds a Ph.D. in American literature from the University of South Carolina at Columbia and an M.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

 

A Conversation with Playwright Diana Small


smallDiana Small

Playwright

 

Theater Department Lecture

Friday, October 23, 6 p.m.

Porter Patio

 

Come hear from emerging playwright Diana Small (recent graduate of Michener Center at UT Austin, MFA playwriting, and Westmont graduate) as she discussed the writing process, her plays Good Day and Mad and a Goat, and trends in contemporary American theatre. Moderated by Good Day director and Westmont faculty member Mitchell Thomas. There will be time for a Q&A at the end.

 

 

 

 

Flooding the Desert: Faith-Based Mobilizing to Save Lives Along the Arizona-Sonora Border


smallKraig Beyerlein

Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame

 

Office of Global Education Lecture

Monday, October 26, 3:30 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Kraig Beyerlein is an Assistant Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Notre Dame, as well as a faculty fellow at the Center for the Study of Religion and Society, a faculty affiliate at the Center for the Study of Social Movements, and a faculty fellow at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. He teaches and studies behavior and social movements, civic engagement and volunteerism, social networks, and the sociology of religion, especially congregation-based mobilization. Dr. Beyerlein holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

 

Poetry Reading


smallGary Young

Lecturer in Creative Writing, University of California, Santa Cruz

 

Westmont Reading Series

Thursday, October 29, 7 p.m.

Adams Center for the Visual Arts, Room 216

 

Gary Young is a poet, artist, printer, and educator. His numerous awards and grants include recognition from the Poetry Society of America, the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His print work is represented in the Museum of Modern Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Getty Center for the Arts, and special collection libraries throughout the country. He teaches Creative Writing, and is the director of the Cowell Press at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

 

 

Westmont-UCSB Joint Hebrew Bible Lecture


smallJack Sasson

Mary Jane Werthan Professor of Jewish Studies and Hebrew Bible, Vanderbilt University Divinity School

 

Westmont-UCSB Joint Hebrew Bible Lecture

Wednesday, November 4

Time and location to be announced

 

Jack Sasson is the Werthan Professor of Judaic and Biblical Studies at Vanderbilt University. Born in Aleppo, Syria to Iraqi and Syrian parents, Dr. Sasson's scholarly efforts cluster around the disciplines of Assyriology and Hebrew Scripture. He has served as President of the American Oriental Society and the International Association for Assyriology, and is the author of numerous books, including commentaries on Ruth, Jonah, and Judges 1-12.

 

 

Why Liberals Win the Culture Wars


smallStephen Prothero

Professor of Religion, Boston University

 

World Christianity and Adams Mission Lecture

Wednesday, November 11, 3:30 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Stephen Prothero is a professor in the Department of Religion at Boston University and the author of numerous books, most recently God is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World--and Why Their Differences Matter and the New York Times bestseller Religious Literacy: What Americans Need to Know. He has commented on religion on dozens of National Public Radio programs, as well as on television, including appearances on "The Daily Show" with Jon Stewart and "The Oprah Winfrey Show."

 

 

The Science of Gratitude


smallRobert Emmons

Professor of Psychology, University of California, Davis

 

Provost's Lecture

Thursday, November 12, 7 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Robert Emmons is the world's leading scientific expert on gratitude. He is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Davis, and the founding editor-in-chief of The Journal of Positive Psychology. He is also the author of the books Gratitude Works! A 21-Day Program for Creating Emotional Prosperity and Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier.

 

 

 

Unknowing Yde: Towards a Trans-Christian Hermeneutic


smallJamie Friedman

Assistant Professor of English, Westmont College

 

Gender Studies Lecture

Monday, November 16, 2015, 7 p.m.

Adams Center for the Visual Arts, Room 216

 

Jamie Friedman specializes in medieval English literature, embodiment, and theories of racial, religious, and gendered identity constructions. Before coming to Westmont in 2010, Dr. Friedman taught at Cornell University, Whitworth University, Gonzaga University, and Portland State University. She has co-edited a volume on women's interior lives in medieval romance literature, and her current projects include considerations of transgendered bodies and selves in medieval French romance as well as a book project on eccentric bodies in Middle English fabulous narrative.

 

 

Yinyang: The Way of Ways


smallRobin Wang

Professor of Philosophy, Loyola Marymount University

 

Erasmus Society Lecture (Philosophy)

Wednesday, November 18, 3:30 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

The concept ofyinyang has lain at the heart of Chinese thought and culturefor thousands of years. The relationship between these two opposing, yet mutually dependent, forces is symbolized in the familiar black and white symbol that has become an icon in popular culture across the world. The real significance ofyinyang, however, is more complex and subtle. Based on Yinyang: The Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and Culture (C ambridge University Press, 2012), this talk will trace the historical development and diverse manifestations ofyinyang, drawing together its different uses and models to lay out the ways in which it has functioned as the warp and woof of Chinese thought and culture.

 

 

Remembering the First Thanksgiving: How to Learn from the Pilgrims Without Using and Abusing Them


smallTracy McKenzie

Professor of History, Wheaton College

 

Erasmus Society Lecture (History)

Thursday, November 19, 3:30 p.m.

Hieronymus Lounge, Kerrwood Hall

 

Tracy McKenzie is a professor of history at Wheaton College who specializes in the economic effects of the American Civil War. His current work focuses on the ways in which American evangelicals have remembered their national heritage. Dr. McKenzie's recent book, The First Thanksgiving: What the Real Story Tells Us about Loving God and Learning From History, challenges Christians to humbly explore the functions of myth and history in constructing a useful past.