The Gaede Institute cosponsors a variety of faculty-organized lecture series: the Pascal Society Lectures, which engage questions of science and faith; the Erasmus Society Lectures, which bring to campus leading scholars in the humanities; two annual lectures organized by Westmont's chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi honors society; special World Christianity, Gender Studies, and departmental lectures; and its own Reel Talk film discussion series. To add these events to your Google Calendar, follow this link, then click the small + icon in the bottom-right corner of the page. Unless otherwise noted, events are free and open to the public.

 

Current Semester | Spring 2017 | Fall 2016 | Spring 2016 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2014

 


Fall 2017 Lectures and Events

Opening Reception for "Untold: Cardboard Box as Reliquary"

Meagan Stirling, Westmont College

Monday, September 4

5-7pm | Adams Patio

Art Department Event

 

Reel Talk: "The Interrupters"

with Merdith Whitnah, Sarah Jirek, and Angela D'Amour

Thursday, September 7

6:30pm | Adams 216

 

Panel Discussion: Tattoos on the Heart

with Rachel Winslow, Charlie Farhadian, Shawn Hill, and Anthony Martinez

Monday, September 18

7pm | Library Main Floor

Westmont Summer Reads

 

Teach-In on Charlottesville

with Ed Song, Rachel Winslow, Sameer Yadav, Lisa DeBoer, Meredith Whitnah, and Paul Willis

Tuesday, September 19

12pm | DC Lawn

 

The Language and Life of Being Adopted

Kelley Nikondeha, Communities of Hope

Tuesday, September 19

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Erasmus Society Lecture

 

Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture and Aquaponics

Clayton Garland, Eco-Conscious Aquaponics

Wednesday, September 20

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Panel Discussion: “Untold: Cardboard Box as Reliquary"

with Meagan Stirling, Marianne Robins, John Blondell, Eric Nelson, and Makayla Monahan

Wednesday, September 20

7pm | Adams 217

Art Department Lecture

 

How a Man Becomes a Thing; Or, the Danger of the Icon in U.S. Abolition

Kya Mangrum, University of Utah

Thursday, September 21

5:15pm | Founders Room

English Department Lecture

 

What Am I Going to Do With My Life? A Conversation on Career and Calling with David Gehring, Westmont in San Francisco Alum

David Gehring, Relay Media

Tuesday, September 26

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont in San Francisco Lecture

 

A Poetry Reading by Teddy Macker

Teddy Macker, UC Santa Barbara

Thursday, September 28

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont Reading Series

The Relationship Between Campus Sexual Assault Rates and Religiosity: Differences in Prevalence or Reporting?

Sarah Jirek, Westmont College

Tuesday, October 3

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture

 

Panel Discussion: Learning for Wisdom

Jim Taylor, Westmont College

Thursday, October 5

3:30pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Provost's Lecture

 

Charity is Dead: Reinventing Compassion and World Change

David Batstone

Tuesday, October 17

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont in San Francisco and Global Studies Lecture

 

Reel Talk: "Good Night, and Good Luck"

Faculty Panel

Thursday, October 19

7pm | Adams 216

 

Why God is Watching: Supernatural Punishment and the Evolution of Cooperation

Dominic Johnson

Monday, October 23

7:00pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Pascal Lecture

 

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental Solutions

Roland Geyer, UCSB Bren School

Tuesday, October 24

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Build It and They Will Come: Habitat Restoration as a Road to Retaining Biodiversity

Karen Flagg, Growing Solutions

Wednesday, November 8

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

The Battle for Jerusalem: Does the New Testament See a Future for the Holy City?

Bruce Fisk, Westmont College

Tuesday, November 14

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Religious Studies and Global Studies Lecture

 

Reel Talk: "Helvetica"

Faculty Panel

Thursday, November 16

7pm | Adams 216

 

Santa Barbara's Next Generation of Environmental Stewards

Alex Bereda, Explore Ecology

Monday, December 4

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

 

Opening Reception for "Untold: Cardboard Box as Reliquary"


StirlingMeagan Stirling, Westmont College


Monday, September 4
5-7pm | Adams Patio
Art Department Event

 

Meagan Stirling is an assistant professor of art at Westmont College, specializing in printmaking, design and intermedia. Her new show is inspired by a particular cardboard box she's kept unopened, like a reliquary, for eighteen years. What untold stories does it contain? What stories do we carry around, unopened and unexamined, in our own minds and hearts?

 

 

 

 

Reel Talk: "The Interrupters"


Interrupterswith Meredith Whitnah, Sarah Jirek, and Angela D'Amour

 

Thursday, September 7

6:30pm | Adams 216

 

"The Interrupters" presents unforgettable profiles in courage, as three former street criminals in Chicago place themselves in the line of fire to protect their communities. The film follows the lives of these “Violence Interrupters,” who include the charismatic daughter of one of the city’s most notorious former gang leaders, the son of a murdered father, and a man haunted by a killing he committed as a teenager. As they intervene in disputes to prevent violence, they reveal their own inspired journeys of struggle and redemption. Presented in collaboration with the Westmont Summer Reads program.

 

 

Panel Discussion: Tattoos on the Heart


TattoosCharlie Farhadian, Rachel Winslow, Shawn Hill, and Anthony Martinez

 

Monday, September 18

7pm | Library Main Floor

Westmont Summer Reads

 

For twenty years, Father Gregory Boyle has run Homeboy Industries, a gang-intervention program in Los Angeles. In Tattoos on the Heart, he distills his experience working in the ghetto into a series of parables inspired by faith. Join Westmont faculty Charlie Farhadian and Rachel Winslow, SB police sargeant Shawn Hill, and City Impact Inc.'s Anthony Martinez as they discuss Boyle's bestselling book. Part of the Westmont Summer Reads program.

 

 

 

Teach-In on Charlottesville


teachEd Song, Rachel Winslow, Sameer Yadav, Lisa DeBoer, Meredith Whitnah, and Paul Willis

 

Tuesday, September 19

12pm | DC Lawn

 

Join us for a multidiscipinary conversation about recent events in Charlottesville, VA that have raised vital questions about race, violence, and history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Language and Life of Being Adopted


KelleyKelley Nikondeha, Communities of Hope

 

Tuesday, September 19

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Erasmus Society Lecture

 

Kelley Nikondeha is the co-director of Communities of Hope, a community development enterprise in Burundi. A graduate of Westmont College, she also serves as the theologian-in-residence for SheLoves Magazine, which takes up questions of faith, love, and justice in worldwide perspective. Her new book, Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging in a Fractured World, explores how adoption can be "a potent metaphor for building community and repairing divisions."

 

 

Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture and Aquaponics


ClaytonClayton Garland , Eco-Conscious Aquaponics

 

Wednesday, September 20

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Clayton Garland is the founder of Eco-Conscious Aquaponics, a Santa Barbara County company that uses aquaponic technologies to grow high-efficiency organic produce with a fraction of the water that conventional agriculture uses. A veteran of the Coast Guard, Garland developed an interest in backyard gardening that eventually evolved into drought-tolerant-tree-collection and then small farming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panel Discussion: "Untold: Cardboard Box as Reliquary"


Cardboard

with Meagan Stirling, Marianne Robins, John Blondell, Eric Nelson, and Makayla Monahan

 

Wednesday, September 20

7pm | Adams 217

Art Department Lecture

 

Meagan Stirling is an assistant professor of art at Westmont College, specializing in printmaking, design and intermedia. Her new show is inspired by a particular cardboard box she's kept unopened, like a reliquary, for eighteen years. What untold stories does it contain? What stories do we carry around, unopened and unexamined, in our own minds and hearts?

 

 

 

How a Man Becomes a Thing, Or, the Dangers of the Icon in U.S. Abolition


KyaKya Mangrum, University of Utah

 

Thursday, September 21

5:15 pm | Founders Room

English Department Lecture

 

Kya Mangrum is an American literature scholar whose research centers on what happens to U.S. narratives of slavery when written texts and visual texts converge. Drawing on her expertise in 18th- and 19th-century American culture, Mangrum will argue that abolitionists' sense of political and moral urgency led to a number of early experiments in virtual reality. By translating numbers into pictures, and pictures into immersive and interactive narratives, abolitionists offered readers and viewers the illusion of being eyewitnesses to slavery's horrors.

 

 

What Am I Going to Do With My Life? A Conversation on Career and Calling with David Gehring, Westmont in San Francisco Alum


GehringDavid Gehring, Relay Media

Tuesday, September 26

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont in San Francisco Lecture

 

David Gehring is a Westmont alum and Trustee who has been instrumental in developing sustainable digital-journalism strategies at Google, The Guardian, and his own company, Relay Media. A resident of the Bay Area, Gehring is committed to developing economic models to support a free and independent press in an evolving digital economy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Poetry Reading by Teddy Macker


TeddyTeddy Macker, UC Santa Barbara

 

Thursday, September 28

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont Reading Series

 

Teddy Macker is a Santa Barbara writer and poet. His work interacts deeply with Central Coast ecology, and includes entries in The Antioch Review, New Letters, The New Ohio Review, and elsewhere, as well as his newest collection of poems, This World. Macker has taught creative writing at UC Santa Barbara and Westmont College.

 

 

 

 

The Relationship Between Campus Sexual Assault Rates and Religiosity: Differences in Prevalence or Reporting?"


SarahSarah Jirek, Westmont College

 

Tuesday, October 3

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Paul C. Wilt Phi Kappa Phi Lecture

 

Sarah Jirek is Associate Professor of Sociology at Westmont College. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Work from the University of Michigan, an M.S.W. in Social Work from the University of Michigan, and a B.A in Sociology from her alma mater, Westmont College. Her teaching and research interests include gender, social inequalities, identity, violence, deviance, prison re-entry, meaning-making, narrative, and resilience.

 

 

 

Panel Discussion: Learning for Wisdom


TaylorJim Taylor, Westmont College

 

Thursday, October 5

3:30pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Provost's Lecture

 

Jim Taylor is Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy Department Chair at Westmont College. He has a B.A from Westmont College, an M.A. in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary, and an M.A. and P.h. D. in Philosophy from the University of Arizona. He specializes in Epistemology, Philosophy of Language, and Christian Apologetics. His newest book, Learning for Wisdom: Christian Education and the Good Life, was published by Abilene Christian University Press in 2017.

 

 

Charity is Dead: Reinventing Compassion and World Change


BatstoneDavid Batstone, Not For Sale

 

Tuesday, October 17

7:00pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Westmont in San Francisco and Global Studies Lecture

 

David Batstoneis an ethics professor at the University of San Francisco and is the founder and president of Not For Sale. Batstone is also a journalist and the president and founder of Right Reality, an international business that engages in social ventures. He is a leader in Central American Mission Partners, a human rights group. Before becoming a human rights activist, Batstone was a Silicon Valley venture capitalist.

 

 

 

Reel Talk: "Good Night, and Good Luck"


Good NightFaculty Panel

 

Thursday, October 19

7pm | Adams 216

 

In this vignette about the media's relationships to politics and business, CBS News impresario Edward R. Murrow (David Straithairn) dedicates himself to exposing the abuses of Senator Joseph McCarthy, who in the early 1950s launched a demagogic campaign against alleged communists in American government, education, and entertainment. While celebrating the convictions of principled news professionals like Murrow and his producer, Fred Friendly (George Clooney), the film unsparingly depicts the ways that our information about the world can be shaped, directed, and bounded by the corporations that foot the bill.

 

 

Why God is Watching: Supernatural Punishment and the Evolution of Cooperation


JohnsonDominic Johnson, Co-Director, Oxford Martin Programme on Natural Governance

 

Monday, October 23

7:00pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Pascal Lecture

 

For millennia human civilizations have utilized religion to help create moral order, invoking supernatural as well as earthly punishment as a deterrent. People who commit crimes or other bad deeds have been thought to suffer retribution in this or the next life, while rewards - abstract or material - await those who do good. This simple but powerful idea has long served to help deter self-interest and achieve remarkable levels of cooperation among humans around the world and throughout history. Indeed, these beliefs are so good at promoting cooperation that they may have been favored by natural selection. Today, while secularism and unbelief are at an all-time high, the willingness to believe in some kind of payback or karma remains nearly universal. Even atheists often feel they are being vicariously monitored. Dominic Johnson explores this belief as it has developed over time and how it has shaped the course of human evolution. How did such a belief in supernatural consequences arise in human history? How did it survive in the face of atheism? Does it expand or limit the potential for local, regional and global cooperation? And what, if anything, will temper self-interest and promote cooperation if religion declines? In short, do we still need God?

 

 

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental Solutions


RolandRoland Geyer, UCSB Bren School

 

Tuesday, October 24

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Roland Geyer teaches courses at UCSB’s Bren School in the emerging field of industrial ecology. Dr. Geyer is interested in the life cycle of manufactured goods--the processes related to transforming raw materials into products and, ultimately, waste--and in the environmental and economic potential of reuse and recycling activities. He has worked extensively as an advisor to the steel industry as it evolves and creates better products that can be made with fewer resources.

 

 

Build It and They Will Come: Habitat Restoration as a Road to Retaining Biodiversity


Karen FlaggKaren Flagg, Growing Solutions

 

Wednesday, November 8

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Karen Flagg is the founder of Growing Solutions, a Santa Barbara nonprofit that works to build environmental and societal sustainability through hands-on education. Growing Solutions was founded in the late 1990s, when toxic runoff in local watersheds produced a water-quality crisis off Santa Barbara beaches. Since then, the organization has worked on hundreds of coastal projects throughout Southern California.

 

 

 

 

The Battle for Jerusalem: Does the New Testament See a Future for the Holy City?


FiskBruce Fisk, Westmont College

 

Tuesday, November 14

7pm | Hieronymus Lounge

Religious Studies and Global Studies Lecture

 

Bruce Fisk is Professor of New Testament at Westmont College with research interests in the Gospels, Jesus in historical context, and the interpretation of apocalyptic literature. He travels to the Middle East frequently and has led many Westmont off-campus programs to Israel/Palestine, Jordan, Syria, Egypt and Turkey. Dr. Fisk holds a  Ph.D. from Duke University, an M.A. in New Testament and an M. Div. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and a B.S. from Cairn University.

 

 

 

 

Reel Talk: "Helvetica"


HelveticaFaculty Panel

 

Thursday, November 16

7pm | Adams 216

 

Messages and meaning come to us not only--and perhaps not even primarily--through propositions and arguments, but through the invisible pressures of culture. Album covers and advertisements, subway signs and IRS forms have embedded within them powerful claims about what human life is and what it ought to be. This film explores these meanings by profiling Helvetica, perhaps the world's most popular font. How could a particular way of rendering letters mean "modern optimism" or "cold commercialism" or "the Vietnam War"? Come learn how, as one of the film's subjects puts it, designers are "putting their wires in our heads."

 

 

Santa Barbara's Next Generation of Environmental Stewards


ExploreAlex Bereda, Explore Ecology

 

Monday, December 4

3:30pm | Founders Room

Sustainability Speaker Series

 

Alex Bereda is the Education Director for Explore Ecology, a Santa Barbara environmental education and arts nonprofit. Explore Ecology works with over 30,000 children each year, inspiring them to engage with the natural world, think critically, and experience the value of environmental stewardship. Their programs include the Art From Scrap Creative ReUse Store and Gallery, the Watershed Resource Center at Hendry’s Beach, and ReUseSB.