Language students at Westmont can study German at the elementary and intermediate levels and can declare a major or minor in French or in Spanish. Many students majoring in other subjects, whether their vision is for the global economy, serving the local community or the mission field, are declaring a double major, combining Economics and Business, Social Work, or Religious Studies, with either French or Spanish.  We also offer a minor in both Spanish and French, which is a valuable complement to every major.  A fourth opportunity is the English-Modern Language major, a very appealing major for students with a special interest in comparative literature.

MonetClose student-faculty relationships, small class sizes, and flexibility in the curriculum all contribute to meet students’ needs in studying French.

Due to the role France and the French have played in the world’s culture and civilization, the French major lends itself particularly well to doubling with majors in religious studies, political science, philosophy, economics and business, mathematics, history, art, music, and theatre arts, among others.

A liberal arts and sciences education opens the door to a broad range of vocations. French majors usually develop the skill to express themselves gracefully and the cultural sensitivity to understand others. These competencies enhance their contribution to every profession. Every field needs people prepared to communicate meaningfully with others, especially foreign missions, domestic human-service agencies, education, international business, law, and government services, and the arts.

Description of the Major

The study of a foreign language prepares us to live in an ever-shrinking world. But the joy of studying a language and its literature lies in our widening perspective and growing appreciation, not only of the
world’s rich and varied cultural heritage, but of people shaped by a civilization different from our own. Historically, the French have had a pivotal influence on diplomacy, politics, and economics as well as on mathematics, the sciences, theology, philosophy, literature, and every form of art. The great body of French literature, whose importance in every period and genre is comparable only to that of English, allows us to live vicariously the history, philosophy, sociology, and psychology of another nation. The French major develops the capacities for a sensitive and refined use of language and affection and admiration for a people whose cultural achievement is distinguished.

Distinctive Features

The French major combines the experience of living and studying in a foreign country with that of the residential liberal arts college. French majors may choose either fall or spring semester, usually in their
junior year, to take a full course of study (14-16 units) at an approved university in a region where French is the native language. Course offerings vary from year to year and from university to university, but always include language, literature, and civilization and culture classes. Westmont students majoring in French may choose one of these universities in France: Université de Paris-Sorbonne, Cours de Civilisation Française de la Sorbonne; Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier, Institut Méditerranéen de Langues de Spécialités; Université d’Aix-en-Provence, Institut d’Etudes Françaises pour Etudiants
Etrangers; or a Brethren Colleges Abroad Program at Université de Strasbourg. Students who wish for personal or family reasons to study in French Canada, French Switzerland, French Belgium, or French Africa may petition for approval of a program in one of those regions.

Close student-faculty relationships, small class sizes, excellent language materials and internet resources, and flexibility in the curriculum all contribute to meet students’ needs in studying French.

Due to the role France and the French have played in the world’s culture and civilization, the French major lends itself particularly well to doubling with majors in English, religious studies, political science, philosophy, economics and business, mathematics, history, art, music, and theatre arts, among others.
Career Choices. A liberal arts and sciences education opens the door to a broad range of vocations. French majors usually develop the skill to express themselves gracefully and the cultural sensitivity to understand others. These competencies enhance their contribution to every profession. Every field needs people prepared to communicate meaningfully with others, especially foreign missions, domestic human-service agencies, education, international business, law, and government services, and the arts.